Technology Electives - Stage 5, Years 9 and 10

Industrial Technology - Metal

The Metal focus area provides opportunities for students to develop knowledge, understanding and practical skills in relation to the metal and associated industries.

The specific areas of study include:

  • sheet metal products
  • metal machining projects
  • fabricated projects
  • bench fitting products

Research and theory components develop deeper knowledge and understanding of materials, tools and techniques related to metal.

Projects will promote the sequential development of skills and reflect an increasing degree of student autonomy as they progress through the course.

Industrial Technology - Timber

The Timber focus area provides opportunities for students to develop knowledge, understanding and practical skills in relation to the timber and associated industries.

The specific areas of study include

  • furniture items
  • storage and transportation products
  • small stepladders

Research and theory components develop deeper knowledge and understanding of materials, tools and techniques related to timber.

Projects will promote the sequential development of skills and reflect an increasing degree of student autonomy as they progress through the course.

Graphics Technology

Graphics is a universal language and an important tool for thinking and communicating. Graphics Technology develops in students specific manipulative and cognitive skills in using a variety of tools, materials and techniques widely available in industrial, commercial and domestic settings.

An important part of the cognitive process associated with this subject involves the capacity to solve problems and the generation and use of images, models and pictures. They will become confident in the application of conventions and procedures that are essential to the global transfer of concepts and images irrespective of language barriers.

Students become increasingly productive, creative, discriminating and confident in the development and use of a range of technologies relevant to current practice in graphics and graphics-related industries.

Students are encouraged to develop collaborative skills in the real and virtual worlds using intranet and/or extranet technologies.

 

Food Technology 

Food Technology in Year 9

Food Technology in Year 9 is an elective course that covers the course focus of Food Selection and Health, Food in Australia and Food for Special Needs. Students demonstrate hygienic handling of food to ensure safe and appealing food products. They justify food choices by analysing the factors that influence eating habits. Students select and employ a range of appropriate techniques and equipment for a variety of food specific purposes. They also examine the relationship between food, technology and society.

 

Food Technology in Year 10

Food Technology in Year 10 is divided into two courses, Food for Special Occasions and Food Service and Catering. All Food Technology Students complete both courses, studying each topic for one semester each. Food Service and Catering allows students to experience some components of the Hospitality Course. Not only do they demonstrate hygienic food handling to ensure safe and appealing food products appropriate for catering, they examine aspects of food service and catering ventures and employment, within the sector and across a variety of settings. They also have the opportunity to complete a TAFE Introductory Barista Course, for an additional cost. Food for Special Occasions explores a range of special occasions including Social, Cultural, Religious, Historical and family. It also examines the elements of food preparation and production involved in small and large scale catering. Students plan and prepare safe food, demonstrating appropriate food handling and presentation skills.   

 

Textiles Technology

Textiles Technology encourages students to be competent, creative, responsible and reflective learners. The course involves a large component of project work. Students are involved over two years in investigation, experimentation, designing and making a range of textile items.

Textiles Technology in Year 9

The first project introduces students to a range of dyeing, colouration and surface decoration techniques. Students produce a uniquely design fabric which is then manufactured into a “kit” bag.

The ”Sleepwear” unit  involves students designing and making coordinating pieces of sleepwear and investigating the properties and performance of a range of different textile materials.

The “Furnishing Unit” allows students to explore interior design and develop skills in using the elements and principles of design. They may manufacture items such as bean bags, cushions, wall hangings or lampshades.

All project work gives students the opportunity to be creative and independent learners. Students are encouraged to develop their own style through the expression of individual ideas. Throughout the course students document their project work though the use of a folio. The folio allows students to demonstrate their ideas from inspiration, through to experimentation, designing, costing and manufacture.

 

Textiles technology in Year 10

Semester 1 involves students investigating costume design. Students will develop an idea from an inspiration and learn more complicated construction techniques. Students will also explore the work of costume designers such as Catherine Martin. Semester 2 may involve students manufacturing a range of accessories or working on individual projects.

Throughout the course students may have the opportunity to participate in a variety of excursions and activities. Sydney based excursions can involve visits to the workrooms at the Sydney Opera centre, a costume parade at Ultimo TAFE, a styling or drawing workshop at the Whitehouse Institute of Design and the Powerhouse Museum. Additional excursions could also include appropriate exhibitions at Newcastle Regional Art Gallery or looking at the work of other designers such as those involved in the Renew Newcastle project.

 

 

iSTEM

iSTEM was first offered in NSW as an approved Board of Studies elective in 2013. San Clemente was one of the initial seven schools who were keen to take it up. The reason the course was developed was to address the shortfall in students from Australia following career pathways in the STEM fields. STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics and is the fastest growing area of employment across the world attracting some of the most handsome salaries.

iSTEM aims to develop students problem solving skills and introduce them to real world applications of Science and Technology. They do this through many projects, working in teams to produce solutions. Projects include building bridges out of newspaper only, or out of Manila folders to hold several kilograms. They will also be developing electric vehicles, wind tunnels and robotically controlled automated systems. The students will have a chance to visit industry to see examples of how engineers solve context based problems. At the end of Year 10, students are expected to produce their own engineered project.